Social Studies

Chair:
Mr. Eric KuhlmanWorld History, Pop Culture, Freshman Focus

Teachers:
Mr. John Schnieders – American Government, Current Events, College Macroeconomics ONU 1410
Mr. Edmund MisiakiewiczUS History, Philosophy
Mr. Wes Horstman American Government
Dr. Joseph Abbott – College Psychology RSC PSY 1010 (first semester)

 

Course: World History
Course #: 571
Pre-Requisite: None
Credit: 1

This course is a survey of world history and the cultures of the world with an emphasis on the Modern Era from the Enlightenment to the present.  The course will include historical, multicultural, geographical, economic, technological, social, political and current event strands.

Course: AP US History
Course #: 274
Pre-Requisite: Teacher Recommendation Required

Credit: 1

This course will trace the story of American History within an accelerated curriculum.   It is designed for a limited enrollment of sophomores.  The topics covered include American colonization to the Present day.

Course: US History 10
Course #: 275
Pre-Requisite:
Credit: 1

In addition to a thorough understanding of the events that shaped the United States, the students will be involved with interpreting these events from various viewpoints.  Students will explore the many links between the issues of yesterday and today to help explain the continuing relevance and drama of historical events.  The course will focus on topics from the Reconstruction Period to the Present.

Course: American Government
Course #: 276
Pre-Requisite: None
Credit: .5

This course provides students with knowledge of the United States constitution with a detailed understanding of executive, legislative and judicial functions.  Using the constitution and its amendments, the student should be able to identify, express and defend their own rights in everyday life.  There is an emphasis on interpretation and involvement in the relevant politics of the day.


Course: Economics

Course #: 580
Pre-Requisite: None
Credit: .5

This course is a one semester survey of both microeconomics and macroeconomics.  It provides students with an understanding of the economic concept; that is, how we (people, firms and government) make decisions through a cost-benefit analysis.  Topics covered include; supply and demand, elasticity, economic utility, factors of production, labor markets, wage and price determination, Gross Domestic Product, interest rates, unemployment, inflation, taxation, government spending, Wall Street, the Federal Reserve System, and international trade.

Course: Principals of Microeconomics (Juniors)
Course #:582
Pre-Requisite: Teacher Recommendation, completion of Algebra II
Credit: .5

A study of microeconomics (the “parts” of the economy), concepts and principles, plus current issues in micro-economics.


Course: Principals of Microeconomics (Seniors)
Course #:583
Pre-Requisite: Teacher Recommendation, completion of Algebra II
Credit: .5

A study of microeconomics (the “parts” of the economy), concepts and principles, plus current issues in micro-economics.


Course: Principals of Macroeconomics (Seniors)
Course #:584
Pre-Requisite: Teacher Recommendation, completion of Algebra II
Credit: .5

A study of macroeconomics (the “whole” economy), concepts, and principles, plus current issues in macroeconomics.

 

ELECTIVES:

Course: AP European History
Course #: 573
Pre-Requisite: Teacher Recommendation
Credit: 1

This college-level course is offered to highly motivated students.  This course addresses European History since 1450, introducing students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live.

Course: College Psychology (Juniors)
Course #: 801
Pre-Requisite: College Readiness Test Administered by Rhodes
Credit: .5

This is a James Rhodes college course designed to provide an introduction to psychology.  The emphasis of this class is on the application of the scientific method to individual behavior and thought processes.  The five major theoretical perspectives discussed are physiological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and psychoanalytic perspectives.  Topics include physiology, learning, cognitions, development, personality, social and abnormal behavior and therapy.

Course: College Sociology (Juniors)
Course #: 802
Pre-Requisite: College Readiness Test Administered by Rhodes
Credit: .5

This is a James Rhodes College course designed as a scientific study of society, including social structure and organization, human behavior, and patterns of interaction between individuals and groups.  Students gain a sociological perspective to observing, analyzing and understanding the social world.  They learn terms, concepts and theories essential to understanding the field of sociology.  They realize the structures of society and their influence on human behavior.  They are exposed to the ways of deviant behavior and its influence on society, the variety and influence of social movements, and the causes and nature of social change.

Course: Current Events
Course #: 578
Pre-Requisite:
Credit: .5

Current Events is devoted to studying the origins and development of political and social problems that confront contemporary humanity.  Possibilities include regional studies (e.g. the situation in Iraq), as well as environmental issues, and global economic development.  Specific topics to explore will be developed in conjunction with the students according to their interests and needs.

Course: Pop Culture 1 & 2 (Sophomores, Juniors & Seniors)
Course #: 598 and/ or 599
Pre-Requisite: None
Credit: .5 or 1 – Pop Culture may be taken as a 1st semester or full year course.

Pop culture defines America.  What we read, watch, hear and experience everyday becomes part of our collective consciousness.  This course educates students about American pop culture as it developed through the Twentieth Century.  It explores headline events impacting culture, iconic figures, slang, music, fashion, sports, movies, television, literature and toys and games in the decades from the 1920’s to the present.

Course: Freshmen Focus
Course #: 910
Pre-Requisite: None
Credit: .5

This yearlong course focuses on techniques and learning strategies to improve student’s study skills. Emphasis is on students taking organized notes, time management, test-taking strategies, active listening, goal setting and methods of conducting research. Additionally, life skills will also be emphasized. Topics such as budget and finance, manners and etiquette, physical and nutritional health, social and relational skills, and much more will be covered in this new, required class for incoming freshmen.